Featured

A Sick Child Should Never Lose Hope.

DJ’s Hope 4 Hearts Mission is Giving hope to others through the spirit of one child, we are dedicated to the healing hearts of children, So that he or she can grow in love, peace, and happiness. We believe and teach that giving is the way to accomplish our hopes for them. We welcome you to follow our cause and all the Children and families we help.  You can also follow us at djshope.com, twitter @djshope4hearts & facebook.

Please consider us for any future donation as every dollar  given makes a difference to a sick child. Also feel free to share your childhood heart disease story below.  We have helped many Transplant kids & hope they to join us for feedback.

Human Family

by Maya Angelou

I note the obvious differences
in the human family.
Some of us are serious,
some thrive on comedy.

Some declare their lives are lived
as true profundity,
and others claim they really live
the real reality.

The variety of our skin tones
can confuse, bemuse, delight,
brown and pink and beige and purple,
tan and blue and white.

I’ve sailed upon the seven seas
and stopped in every land,
I’ve seen the wonders of the world
not yet one common man.

I know ten thousand women
called Jane and Mary Jane,
but I’ve not seen any two
who really were the same.

Mirror twins are different
although their features jibe,
and lovers think quite different thoughts
while lying side by side.

We love and lose in China,
we weep on England’s moors,
and laugh and moan in Guinea,
and thrive on Spanish shores.

We seek success in Finland,
are born and die in Maine.
In minor ways we differ,
in major we’re the same.

I note the obvious differences
between each sort and type,
but we are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

We are more alike, my friends,
than we are unalike.

Source: Human family by Maya Angelou. (n.d.). Retrieved April 25, 2021, from https://allpoetry.com/Human-Family

Photo source: Parker, S. (n.d.). [Photo of Maya Angelou]. Retrieved from https://www.readitforward.com/essay/article/authors-celebrate-90-years-of-maya-angelou/

Heart-Healthy Homemade Chicken Tenders with Everything Bagel Seasoning over Salad

Did you know that sesame seeds (like those found in Everything Bagel Seasoning) may help decrease high cholesterol and triglycerides* according to studies? Huge thank you to EatingWell.com for this heart-healthy take on every kid’s favorite: Chicken Tenders!

Tip: Using everything bagel spice is a quick way to season and add extra crunch to breadcrumbs for chicken tenders. If you can’t find any premixed, make your own by combining equal parts dried minced onion and garlic, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, salt and ground pepper (see Associated Recipes). This healthy chicken recipe tops a simple salad for an easy dinner that’s ready in 25 minutes.

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 
  • 1 large egg 
  • ½ cup panko breadcrumbs, preferably whole-wheat
  • 1 tablespoon everything bagel seasoning
  • 1 pound chicken tenders
  • ¼ cup grapeseed or canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon white-wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • ⅛ teaspoon ground pepper
  • 5 ounces mixed baby greens

Directions

  • Step 1 Place flour in a shallow dish and lightly beat egg in another shallow dish. Mix breadcrumbs and everything bagel seasoning in a third shallow dish. Dredge chicken tenders in flour, then egg, then breadcrumbs.
  • Step 2 Heat grapeseed (or canola) oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the chicken and cook, turning once, until golden brown and an instant-read thermometer registers 165 degrees F, about 7 minutes total, adjusting the heat as needed to prevent burning.
  • Step 3 Whisk olive oil, vinegar, mustard, honey and pepper in a large bowl. Add greens and toss to coat. Serve the greens topped with the chicken.

Resources

Spring Green Soup with Chicken

Whether spring has sprung or the air is still chilly, there really is nothing quite like a good soup! Learn how to prepare this quick and easy, protein-rich, flavorful recipe your kids will LOVE. 🥰

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 pound chicken tenders
  • 2 medium leeks, white and light green parts only, thinly sliced
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 4 cups low-sodium chicken broth
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • ¾ teaspoon ground pepper, plus more for serving
  • 1 bunch asparagus, cut into 1-inch pieces

Directions

  • Step 1 Heat oil in a large pot over medium-high heat. Add chicken and cook, flipping once, until browned and cooked through, about 6 minutes total. Transfer to a plate.
  • Step 2 Add leeks, onion and celery to the pot. Reduce heat to medium and cook, stirring occasionally and scraping up any browned bits, until very tender, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Add broth, salt and pepper; bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to maintain a simmer, cover and cook for 5 minutes. Add asparagus and spinach; cook until the asparagus is tender, about 5 minutes more.
  • Step 3 Shred the chicken into bite-size pieces and add to the soup. Stir in parsley and Parmesan. Serve the soup topped with more pepper and Parmesan, if desired.

Nutrition Info

Serving Size: 2 Cups Per Serving: 314 calories; protein 37.9g; carbohydrates 20.1g; dietary fiber 5.1g; sugars 5g; fat 11.5g; saturated fat 2.3g; cholesterol 59.9mg; vitamin a iu 5498.5IU; vitamin c 46.5mg; folate 221.2mcg; calcium 174.1mg; iron 5.4mg; magnesium 69.2mg; potassium 713.1mg; sodium 741.5mg.

Recipe from https://www.eatingwell.com/recipe/279668/spring-green-soup-with-chicken/

Colorfully Heart Healthy Salad

They say that the key to eating healthy is ‘eating rainbows’, or ‘colorful’ foods (like berry-rich, leafy green salads)! Check out this Heart Healthy Salad recipe from HeartAtWorkRecipes.com for a nutrient-rich lunch that your kids will LOVE to munch on during those socially-distanced picnics at the park!

Ingredients

  • 1 Package Organic Arugula, Baby Spinach, and Butter leaf Lettuce Leafy green vegetables are so good for you it’s staggering. On top of all this, leafy greens are rich in fiber, which lowers cholesterol and reduces your risk of heart disease.
  • 1 Can/Jar Hearts of Palm
  • 1 Container Grape Tomatoes Tomatoes have two key nutrients that have a big impact on heart health: lycopene and potassium. Some research shows that lycopene may lower LDL, or “bad” cholesterol.
  • 1/2 Cup Green Olives Olives are very high in vitamin E and other powerful antioxidants. Studies show that they are good for the heart, and may protect against osteoporosis and cancer. The healthy fats in olives are extracted to produce extra virgin olive oil, one of the key components of the incredibly healthy Mediterranean diet.
  • Chopped Green Onions Onion is high in vitamins and minerals and antioxidants and some benefits may include reducing the risk of heart disease.
  • 1/2 Cup Sunflower Seeds Sunflower seeds contain high levels of both monounsaturated and omega-6 fats, and may help reduce inflammation and cholesterol levels.
  • 1/2 Cup Raw Almonds The health benefits of almonds include lower blood sugar levels, reduced blood pressure and lower cholesterol levels.
  • Handful Craisins
  • 1 Tablespoon Flaxseed Meal Flax’s primary healthy benefit is due to the omega-3 essential fatty acids, “good” fats that have been shown to have heart-healthy effects.
  • 1/4 Cup Shaved Parmesan
  • Extra Virgin Felippo Berio Olive Oil To Taste-Olive oil helps decrease the total cholesterol and “bad” LDL cholesterol levels
  • Alessi Balsamic Vinegar To Taste-Balsamic vinegar has antioxidants present that help protect the body from heart disease
  • 2-3 Dashes Garlic Salt or Sea Salt
  • 10 Grinds Fresh Black Pepper

Instructions

Rinse and Wash all veggies and combine these heart healthy ingredients for a splendid salad…Enjoy!!! 😊

Recipe from: https://heartatworkrecipes.com/recipe/colorfully-heart-healthy-salad/

Help Children Learn at Home

Keep Children Engaged During Virtual Learning or While School’s Out

Photo by Sigmund on Unsplash

Original Article published by the CDC and can be found HERE

There are many ways you can help children learn at home. Whether your child is attending in-person classes, online classes at home, or a combination of both, adjusting to a new learning routine can be challenging and stressful for everyone involved. The following strategies are meant to help you get the support you need to facilitate at-home learning while staying connected and engaged with your school community. Remember – there is no “right” way for your child to learn at home. Do what works for you and your family, and make sure to prioritize your own well-being so that you stay healthy and feel ready to address your child’s needs in education and beyond.

Stay in touch with your child’s school

  • Whether your child is learning from home full time or part of the time, communicate challenges to your school. If you face technology or connectivity issues, need additional resources to support at-home learning, do not have anyone to supervise your child while they take virtual classes, or if your child is having a hard time completing assignments, let the school know. Good questions to ask are below:
    • Ask whether there are out-of-school time programs that are continuing to operate, some of which might also be open during the school day.
    • If coordinating with other families is of interest to you, ask whether the school is supporting families who wish to form cohorts or “pods.”
    • Ask whether the school can recommend any school or community programs that assist with small group in-person learning.
  • Talk to your child’s teacher regularly about academic progress and any issues they are having. Consider ideas about how to better support your child.
  • If your child is older (in middle or high school), you may consider encouraging them to communicate directly with their teachers about progress, challenges, and learning needs.

Ask about available school services

  • Check with your school on plans to continue meal services during school closures or virtual instruction. Many schools are keeping school facilities open to allow families to pick up meals or are providing grab-and-go meals at a central location. If you or your household need help in obtaining nutritious food options, find additional resources at USDA Nutrition Assistance Programexternal icon, or call the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Hunger Hotline at 1-866-3-HUNGRY or 1-877-8-HAMBRE to speak with a representative about finding food resources such as meal sites, food banks, and other social services available near you.
  • If you have a child who receives special education services, accommodations or services in school through their 504 plan or individualized education program (IEP), these should be continued, as much as possible, while learning at home. Check in with your school about options to access these interventions. Many schools are continuing interventions like speech therapy, small group classes, extended time, and more. You may also consult your state’s special education agency webpageexternal icon for additional resources and information. For additional information about continuing services, please see https://www.ed.gov/coronavirus/program-information#specedexternal icon.
  • Changes related to COVID-19 may cause your child to experience stress and anxiety. For support, ask your school how to connect your child to additional school support staff such as the school counselor, academic advisor, psychologist, or social worker. Learn more about helping children cope with emergencies.

Create a schedule and routine for learning at home

  • Where possible, set up a designated, quiet space in your home for on-line learning. Try to have your child choose a space where they agree to learn.
  • If not currently in place, develop a good line of communication with your student, allowing them to share openly with you how they’re feeling to maximize educational attainment.
  • Limit distractions from siblings, television shows, tablets, or other devices that may take your child’s attention away from learning. Set up rules for everyone at home to try to be as quiet as possible while your child is engaged in class.
  • Review assignments and expectations from the school, and help your child establish a reasonable pace for completing their schoolwork. You may need to assist your child with turning on devices, reading instructions, and typing answers. If you encounter difficulties in using technology needed for online learning, contact your child’s teacher for assistance.
  • Develop consistent routines and expectations that work for your child and reinforce them through reminders (e.g., written schedule, pictures), positive feedback, or rewards.
  • Have consistent bedtimes and have your child wake up at the same time on learning days.
  • Insert breaks in the schedule for fun activities, free time, healthy meals and snacks, time outdoors and physical activity. Provide opportunities for time away from screens. If your schedule allows, take breaks with your child to connect and hear about how the day is going.
  • Consider ways your child can stay connected with their friends and other family members without spending time in person (e.g., video chats, FaceTime, drive-by visits).
  • Plan for flexibility in the schedule—it’s okay to adapt based on your day! Consider designating an amount of time each week that allows for more flexibility in your child’s learning schedule.

Consider your child’s individual learning needs

  • The transition to being at home will be different for preschoolers, elementary students, middle school students, and high school students. Ask your child what they like and find challenging about learning at home, then make adjustments, as needed.
  • If your child has special or intensive support needs, consider increasing the structure and consistency of the learning routine. Increase the frequency of reminders about expectations and share positive feedback or other rewards when they are met. Consider spending time at the end of each day of at-home learning to talk with your child about the progress they made toward their goals that day.
  • For younger children or children who have trouble focusing, allow for more frequent breaks and use a timer to indicate the end of a break. You may also consider providing breaks as rewards for completing more challenging activities.
  • For younger children or children with sensory needs, sitting at a table all day may prove challenging. Consider alternatives such as floor space, floor pillows, or a yoga ball.
  • For children with an individualized education program (IEP), collaborate with your child’s special education team to develop a virtual learning plan and specific learning, social, emotional, or behavioral goals. Work together to brainstorm strategies that will support your child’s progress toward goals (e.g., visual goal charts and schedules, visual or audible activity timers, verbal positive reinforcement, a comfortable learning environment), and commit to check-in regularly about progress.
  • For English learners, collaborate with your school to ensure continuity of your child’s language instruction educational program and language accommodations, as appropriate. See the National Clearinghouse for English Language Acquisition resources related to continuity of learningexternal icon.

Consider additional options for learning

  • If you’re looking for additional at-home learning options beyond regular schoolwork, collaborate with your child’s teacher or other families to brainstorm creative learning opportunities that meet the needs and interests of children in different age groups in your household while keeping everyone safe from COVID-19 (e.g., virtual fieldtrips, virtual college visits, at-home activity ideas).
  • Consider hands-on activities, like puzzles, painting, drawing, and making things to supplement online learning activities and reduce screen time.
  • Independent play can also be used in place of structured learning or used as a reward when your child completes a challenging structured learning activity or task.
  • Practice handwriting and grammar by writing letters to friends and family members. This is a great way to help your child feel connected to others without face-to-face contact.
  • Consider starting a journal with your child to document this time and discuss the shared experiences, challenges, and memories.
  • See if your local library is hosting virtual or live-streamed reading events, and encourage your child to explore available audiobooks or e-books that they can read for fun.

Help Stop the Spread of COVID-19 in Children

Ways to Protect Children from getting and spreading COVID-19

Original Article published by the CDC and can be found HERE.

“Make sure your child washes their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Read more and watch a video on how to wash hands correctly.

If soap and water are not readily available, make sure your child uses a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol. Teach your child to cover all surfaces of their hands with hand sanitizer and rub their hands together until they feel dry. If your child is under 6 years of age, supervise them when they use hand sanitizer.

You, as a parent, guardian, or caretaker, play an important role in teaching your child to wash their hands.

  • Explain that handwashing can keep them healthy and stop germs from spreading to others.
  • Be a good role model — if you wash your hands as recommended, they’re more likely to do the same.
  • Make handwashing a family activity.

Practice cough and sneeze etiquette by covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when sneezing or coughing, throwing the tissue in the closest garbage can, and washing your hands after you throw it away.

Avoid close contact

Keep your child at least 6 feet away from others who don’t live with them and those who are sick (such as coughing and sneezing).

Limit in-person playtime and connect virtually with other children

CDC recognizes this pandemic has been stressful to many. Socializing and interacting with peers can be a healthy way for children to cope with stress and connect with others. However, the key to slowing the spread of COVID-19 is to limit close contact with others as much as possible.

An important guiding principle to remember is that the more people your child interacts with, and the longer that interaction, the higher the risk of COVID-19 spread. While your child may be spending time with other people as they return to childcare or school settings, you should limit your child’s interactions with additional children and adults outside of childcare or school to decrease risk.

For playdates, the risk of COVID-19 increases as follows:

  • Lowest risk: No in-person playdates. Children connect virtually (via phone calls and video chats).
  • Medium risk: Infrequent playdates with the same family or friend who is also practicing everyday preventive measures. Children maintain a distance of at least 6 feet from each other during the playdate. ​Playdates are held outdoors. (Indoor spaces are more risky than outdoor space where there is less ventilation and it might be harder to keep children apart.)
  • Highest Risk: Frequent indoor playdates with multiple friends or families who are not practicing everyday preventive measures. Children do not maintain a distance of 6 feet from each other.

To help your child maintain social connections while social distancing, help them have supervised phone calls or video chats with their friends.

Limit your child’s interaction with people at highest risk of severe illness from COVID-19

To protect those who are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19, you may consider taking these extra precautions.

  • Separate your child from others in your household who have an increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19.
  • Carefully consider who might be best to provide childcare if you are unable to care for your child (for example, you are not able to stay with your child while childcare or school is closed).
  • Limit your child’s contact with other people if someone at higher risk for COVID-19 will be providing care (such as an older adult or someone with an underlying medical condition).
  • Postpone visits or trips to see grandparents, older family members and family members who are at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. Consider connecting virtually or by writing letters.

Wear a mask

Children 2 years of age and older should wear a mask.

Help your child (if 2 years of age or older) wear a mask correctly when in public and when around people they don’t live with.

CDC recognizes that wearing masks may not be possible in every situation or for some people. Correct and consistent use of masks may be challenging for some children, such as children with certain disabilities, including cognitive, intellectual, developmental, sensory and behavioral disorders. Learn more about what you can do if your child or you cannot wear masks in certain situations.

Note that wearing a mask is not a substitute for other everyday prevention actions, like avoiding close contact with others and washing hands frequently.

Clean & disinfect

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily

Frequently touched surfaces include tables, doorknobs, light switches, remotes, handles, desks, toilets, and sinks.

Wash items, including washable plush toys as needed

  • Follow the manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Use the warmest appropriate water setting and dry items completely.
  • You can wash dirty laundry from a sick person together with other people’s items.

Learn more about cleaning and disinfecting your home.

Consider changing travel plans

Because travel increases your child’s chances of coming in contact with others who may have COVID-19 and your child spreading the virus that causes COVID-19 to others if they are infected, staying home is the best way to protect your child and others from getting sick.

We don’t know if one type of travel is safer than others. Any place where travelers interact with other people (for example, airports, bus stations, train stations, gas stations, restaurants, and rest stops) are places travelers can be exposed to the virus in the air and on surfaces. It can also be hard to stay at least 6 feet apart from other people during travel. Learn more about Travel During COVID-19.”

Content source: National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD)Division of Viral Diseases

🎄🍪 5 #Holiday Treats To Brighten Up Your Family’s #Christmas 🍪🎄

Original Post By Dhruv Vohra

Tasty.co Team

Watch the full video here: https://bit.ly/3lP9lIO

Craving something specific? time stamps are below!

0:06 🎅 Strawberry Santas

0:39 🌲 Cornflake Holly Wreaths

1:13 ☃️ #Snowman Bread & Onion Dip

2:09 🍬 Peppermint Bark

2:57 🍪 Sugar Swirl #Cookies

White Bean Salad

White Bean Salad

Recipe Particulars:

  • Recipe Credit: The recipe was taken from here to promote healthy eating.We are deeply grateful to the author for posting the same: You are helping us encourage a healthy heart :).
  • Servings Size: Makes 4 Servings.
  • Recipe Nutrition Facts: Per serving: 215 calories, 8 g total fat (2 g saturated fat), 22 g carbohydrate, 13 g protein, 8 g dietary fiber, 127 mg sodium

Recipe Ingredients:

  • 2 oz. sugar snap peas
  • 3 medium red radishes
  • 1 can (15 oz.) no salt added navy beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 large green onion, green and white parts, thinly sliced
  • 1 Tbsp. finely chopped shallot
  • 1 Tbsp. light mayonnaise
  • 1 Tbsp. reduced-fat sour cream
  • 1 tsp. Dijon-style mustard
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/3 cup snipped fresh dill, plus 16 small sprigs for garnish
  • 4 hard-cooked eggs, quartered lengthwise
  • 16 cherry tomatoes, halved

Recipe Directions:

  • In small pot of boiling water, cook sugar snap peas 1 minute.
  • Immediately drain in colander.
  • Run cold water over peas while tossing until cool.
  • Cut peas into 1/2-inch pieces and place in medium mixing bowl.
  • Slice radishes, stack slices and cut into quarters making wedges.
  • Add radishes to mixing bowl.
  • Add drained beans, green onion and shallot and toss to combine.
  • In small bowl, combine mayonnaise, sour cream, mustard and cayenne pepper.
  • Mix to blend and season to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Add dressing to bean mixture, using fork to toss gently until well combined.
  • Add chopped dill and mix gently. Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as needed.
  • To serve, spoon one-fourth of bean salad in center of 4 salad plates.
  • Place 4 egg wedges around bean salad on each plate.
  • Add 8 tomato halves and 4 dill springs to each plate and serve.

The Don’t Quit Poem

The poem was referenced from here. The author is unknown.

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When things go wrong, as they sometimes will,
When the road you’re trudging seems all uphill,
When the funds are low and the debts are high,
And you want to smile, but you have to sigh,
When care is pressing you down a bit,
Rest, if you must, but don’t you quit.

Life is queer with its twists and turns,
As every one of us sometimes learns,
And many a failure turns about,
When he might have won had he stuck it out;
Don’t give up though the pace seems slow–
You may succeed with another blow.

Often the goal is nearer than,
It seems to a faint and faltering man,
Often the struggler has given up,
When he might have captured the victor’s cup,
And he learned too late when the night slipped down,
How close he was to the golden crown.

Success is failure turned inside out–
The silver tint of the clouds of doubt,
And you never can tell how close you are,
It may be near when it seems so far,
So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit–
It’s when things seem worst that you must not quit.

– Author unknown –

Emily Kopp’s tale of courage: The Journey ahead…

https://www.flickr.com/photos/pictoquotes/13968196816

All was going fine. I was going through my routine as normally as possible when suddenly in summers of 2010 I felt light headed and tired. It was summer of 2010 when I was feeling light-headed and tired. TheDoctors then informed me that the heart anti-rejection medicine is now causing my kidneys to fail. The room felt far too serious for the news, that I would eventually need a kidney transplant and would probably receive one within the year. By now I am proud of my scars, because these scars developed empathy in me toward other people who suffer from various serious medical conditions and was actually excited when I heard this. More scars to be proud of, would you not say that I was courageous??. I can be more like Sally from Nightmare Before Christmas. I was told that I would have to get bloodwork monthly and inject myself with Aranesp when needed. I told myself that it would be nothing compared to a heart transplant. Silly of me? No at that time it was a perfect thought, I was so positive and the fighter in me was telling me so.Silly me. I could have never have anticipated how long I could possibly wait and only thought of the end result.

In 2012, I got my first job at a place called Chicken Wow. I only worked there for a week until they stopped contacting me. Then I was hired at McDonald’s and worked there for about six months until I decided that I wanted to be treated better and make more money.

DJ’s Hope for Hearts surprised me with a gift card during 2012. I will never forget the kindness and concern given to me.

August of 2012, I started working as a bakery clerk at a grocery store. I had a lot of fun, but as time went on, things became increasingly hectic and difficult for me to keep up with by myself. In August of 2014, my kidneys were at 20% and I was beginning to have tired, dizzy, and dehydration spells. I was forgetting to check the temperatures of food more frequently and discovered that the heart by-pass machine used for my heart transplant effects my memory. Before I could turn in a doctor’s note on time, I was terminated. I was relieved because I thought that I could get proper help by filing a grievance. When I found out that they would not help me and that my grievance was denied, I was furious. I refused to put any effort further on working at such a company and began applying other places.

Applying became emotionally exhausting, and having had only two interviews, I began to lose hope more and more. Why this negativity is approaching me? I kept on wondering. I realize the urgency of having a job and that mycircumstances health condition are effecting affect my chances of getting one. With my hope, my health began to decline more. With my declining health my hope of getting job also declined. My blood pressure and cholesterol arelevel started increasing high, and level of iron and other nutrients started dipping low.

At present as a result of my kidneys failing, my BP and Cholesterol level is very high, while my iron and other nutrients are low, as a result of my kidneys failing. ,Mmy appetite can be horrible and fluctuating, I bruise easily, and feel tired and light-headed often.

For many months, I struggled to accept my reality and awoke in a new rage at my nightmare. I still struggle with it because I can’t picture my life in the future or how I will survive financially. I don’t like feeling helpless. It’s despairing. I’m torn between having a job that is tolerable or taking a huge risk in order to be happy. Currently, I’m in the process of being evaluated so I can be put on the list. All that is left to do is a heart biopsy May of 2015. It’s a waiting game that I have been anxious for from the beginning.

My life now consists of eating, sleeping, and overthinking. I miss having energy and enthusiasm. I sleep so much, I lose track of how long I sleep and my days bleed by. What day is it? It doesn’t matter. What matters is that I’m one day closer to being able to do something about my life. I will get through this.

Life is about being positive, striving to happy and live with self-esteem. I am a strong girl. I will not fail the young boy and his family who donated his heart and thought of other’s happiness during their misery. I draw strength from them, my family, Tony my boyfriend and scores of people who have been with me during my low and high times. I will live a long happy life bereft of misery and negativity.

Prom  Recovering

Len Merriman, Founding member of the board, DJ’s Hope for Hearts, conveys their forever support and strength to Emily : 

Emily K,
All of us at DJ’s Hope 4 Hearts Foundation are thankful for you allowing us to come into your life & follow your heart transplant journey for the past 4 years. We hope you nothing but the best with your continued journey’s and want you to know you we will always be with you on that journey.

You too can help Emily, and others like her. Please read more about how at this link